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Dec 23,  · E bomb seminar report 1. E- bomb Seminar Report ’ INTRODUCTION The next Pearl Harbor will not announce itself with a searing flash ofnuclear light or with the plaintive wails of those dying of Ebola or its geneticallyengineered twin. e bomb seminar luhost.xyz (Size: KB / Downloads: ) ABSTRACT Electromagnetic bombs are Weapons of Electrical Mass Destruction with applications across a broad spectrum of targets, spanning both the strategic and tactical. E- bomb 1. INTRODUCTION The next Pearl Harbor will not announce itself with a searing flash of nuclear light or with the plaintive wails of those dying of Ebola or its genetically. Nov 19,  · E- Bomb PPT PDF Seminar Report Download. An electromagnetic bomb, or e-bomb, is a weapon designed to take advantage of this dependency. But instead of simply cutting off power in an area, an e-bomb would actually destroy most machines that use electricity. Generators would be useless, cars wouldn't run, and there would be no chance of. Bhanu Pratap Behera, 7th Semester Electrical & Electronic Engineering () Bearing Reg. No. Has Successfully Completed The Seminar Report On ELECTROMAGNETIC-BOMB A Weapon Of Electric Mass Destruction In The Partial Fulfillment Of The Sessional Work As Per The Course For The luhost.xyz Degree Of Bput.

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Has Successfully Completed The Seminar Report On ELECTROMAGNETIC-BOMB A Weapon Of Electric Mass Destruction In The Partial. E-BOMB TECHNOLOGY BASE Power source - explosively pumped Flux E bomb seminar report. Venkat RAGHAVENDRA REDDY. E bomb. You could deliver an e-bomb in a number of ways: cruise mis- sile, unmanned .. luhost.xyz Don't Try This at. Explore E Bombs with Free Download of Seminar Report and PPT in PDF and DOC Format. Also Explore the Seminar Topics Paper on E. e-bomb ppt. Uploaded by. dopavian · E Bomb Presentation IWC Washington DC Uploaded by. Vinay Kutre · E-Bomb Seminar Report. Uploaded by. neha.

e bomb seminar report In assessing how power is coupled into targets, two principal coupling modes are recognised in the literature:. Akash Kale. The design of explosive and propellant driven Magneto-Hydrodynamic generators is a much less mature art that that of FCG design. May e bomb seminar report Therefore a hard electrical killmay not be achieved against sekinar targets unless a suitable weapon is used. Fast-acting surge protectors such as those using TVS diodes will block the E1 pulse. E bomb seminar report Force Institute of Technology. Download the Seminar Report for Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb. Download your Presentation Papers from the following Links. Dec 23,  · E- bomb Seminar Report ’03 A low frequency bomb built around an FCG will require a large antennato provide good coupling of power from the weapon into the surroundingenvironment. Whilst weapons built this way are inherently wide band, as most ofthe power produced lies in the frequency band below 1 MHz compact antennasare not an option. E-Bomb Seminar Report - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site. Search Search.

The prosecution of a successful Information Warfare IW campaign against an industrialised or post industrial opponent will require a suitable set of tools. As demonstrated in the Desert Storm air campaign, air power has proven to be a most effective means of inhibiting the functions of an opponent's vital information processing infrastructure.

While Desert Storm demonstrated that the application of air power was the most practical means of crushing an opponent's information processing and transmission nodes, the need to physically destroy these with guided munitions absorbed a substantial proportion of available air assets in the early phase of the air campaign.

Indeed, the aircraft capable of delivery laser guided bombs were largely occupied with this very target set during the first nights of the air battle. The efficient execution of an IW campaign against a modern industrial or post-industrial opponent will require the use of specialised tools designed to destroy information systems. Electromagnetic bombs built for this purpose can provide, where delivered by suitable means, a very effective tool for this purpose.

The effect is characterised by the production of a very short hundreds of nanoseconds but intense electromagnetic pulse, which propagates away from its source with ever diminishing intensity, governed by the theory of electromagnetism.

The ElectroMagnetic Pulse is in effect an electromagnetic shock wave. This pulse of energy produces a powerful electromagnetic field, particularly within the vicinity of the weapon burst. The field can be sufficiently strong to produce short lived transient voltages of thousands of Volts ie kiloVolts on exposed electrical conductors, such as wires, or conductive tracks on printed circuit boards, where exposed.

It is this aspect of the EMP effect which is of military significance, as it can result in irreversible damage to a wide range of electrical and electronic equipment, particularly computers and radio or radar receivers. Subject to the electromagnetic hardness of the electronics, a measure of the equipment's resilience to this effect, and the intensity of the field produced by the weapon, the equipment can be irreversibly damaged or in effect electrically destroyed.

The damage inflicted is not unlike that experienced through exposure to close proximity lightning strikes, and may require complete replacement of the equipment, or at least substantial portions thereof.

Commercial computer equipment is particularly vulnerable to EMP effects, as it is largely built up of high density Metal Oxide Semiconductor MOS devices, which are very sensitive to exposure to high voltage transients.

What is significant about MOS devices is that very little energy is required to permanently wound or destroy them, any voltage in typically in excess of tens of Volts can produce an effect termed gate breakdown which effectively destroys the device. Even if the pulse is not powerful enough to produce thermal damage, the power supply in the equipment will readily supply enough energy to complete the destructive process.

Wounded devices may still function, but their reliability will be seriously impaired. Shielding electronics by equipment chassis provides only limited protection, as any cables running in and out of the equipment will behave very much like antennae, in effect guiding the high voltage transients into the equipment. Computers used in data processing systems, communications systems, displays, industrial control applications, including road and rail signalling, and those embedded in military equipment, such as signal processors, electronic flight controls and digital engine control systems, are all potentially vulnerable to the EMP effect.

Other electronic devices and electrical equipment may also be destroyed by the EMP effect. Telecommunications equipment can be highly vulnerable, due to the presence of lengthy copper cables between devices. Receivers of all varieties are particularly sensitive to EMP, as the highly sensitive miniature high frequency transistors and diodes in such equipment are easily destroyed by exposure to high voltage electrical transients.

It is significant that modern military platforms are densely packed with electronic equipment, and unless these platforms are well hardened, an EMP device can substantially reduce their function or render them unusable.

The technology base which may be applied to the design of electromagnetic bombs is both diverse, and in many areas quite mature. A wide range of experimental designs have been tested in these technology areas, and a considerable volume of work has been published in unclassified literature.

This paper will review the basic principles and attributes of these technologies, in relation to bomb and warhead applications. It is stressed that this treatment is not exhaustive, and is only intended to illustrate how the technology base can be adapted to an operationally deployable capability.

The explosively pumped FCG is the most mature technology applicable to bomb designs. The FCG is a device capable of producing electrical energies of tens of MegaJoules in tens to hundreds of microseconds of time, in a relatively compact package. With peak power levels of the order of TeraWatts to tens of TeraWatts, FCGs may be used directly, or as one shot pulse power supplies for microwave tubes. To place this in perspective, the current produced by a large FCG is between ten to a thousand times greater than that produced by a typical lightning stroke [WHITE78].

The central idea behind the construction of FCGs is that of using a fast explosive to rapidly compress a magnetic field, transferring much energy from the explosive into the magnetic field. The initial magnetic field in the FCG prior to explosive initiation is produced by a start current. In principle, any device capable of producing a pulse of electrical current of the order of tens of kiloAmperes to MegaAmperes will be suitable.

The coaxial arrangement is of particular interest in this context, as its essentially cylindrical form factor lends itself to packaging into munitions. In a typical coaxial FCG , a cylindrical copper tube forms the armature. This tube is filled with a fast high energy explosive. A number of explosive types have been used, ranging from B and C-type compositions to machined blocks of PBX The armature is surrounded by a helical coil of heavy wire, typically copper, which forms the FCG stator.

The stator winding is in some designs split into segments, with wires bifurcating at the boundaries of the segments, to optimise the electromagnetic inductance of the armature coil. The intense magnetic forces produced during the operation of the FCG could potentially cause the device to disintegrate prematurely if not dealt with. This is typically accomplished by the addition of a structural jacket of a non-magnetic material. Materials such as concrete or Fibreglass in an Epoxy matrix have been used.

In principle, any material with suitable electrical and mechanical properties could be used. In applications where weight is an issue, such as air delivered bombs or missile warheads, a glass or Kevlar Epoxy composite would be a viable candidate. It is typical that the explosive is initiated when the start current peaks.

This is usually accomplished with a explosive lense plane wave generator which produces a uniform plane wave burn or detonation front in the explosive. Once initiated, the front propagates through the explosive in the armature, distorting it into a conical shape typically 12 to 14 degrees of arc.

Where the armature has expanded to the full diameter of the stator, it forms a short circuit between the ends of the stator coil, shorting and thus isolating the start current source and trapping the current within the device. The propagating short has the effect of compressing the magnetic field, whilst reducing the inductance of the stator winding. The result is that such generators will producing a ramping current pulse, which peaks before the final disintegration of the device.

Published results suggest ramp times of tens to hundreds of microseconds, specific to the characteristics of the device, for peak currents of tens of MegaAmperes and peak energies of tens of MegaJoules. The current multiplication ie ratio of output current to start current achieved varies with designs, but numbers as high as 60 have been demonstrated. In a munition application, where space and weight are at a premium, the smallest possible start current source is desirable.

The principal technical issues in adapting the FCG to weapons applications lie in packaging, the supply of start current, and matching the device to the intended load.

Interfacing to a load is simplified by the coaxial geometry of coaxial and conical FCG designs. Significantly, this geometry is convenient for weapons applications, where FCGs may be stacked axially with devices such a microwave Vircators. The demands of a load such as a Vircator, in terms of waveform shape and timing, can be satisfied by inserting pulse shaping networks, transformers and explosive high current switches. The design of explosive and propellant driven Magneto-Hydrodynamic generators is a much less mature art that that of FCG design.

Technical issues such as the size and weight of magnetic field generating devices required for the operation of MHD generators suggest that MHD devices will play a minor role in the near term. In the context of this paper, their potential lies in areas such as start current generation for FCG devices.

The fundamental principle behind the design of MHD devices is that a conductor moving through a magnetic field will produce an electrical current transverse to the direction of the field and the conductor motion.

In an explosive or propellant driven MHD device, the conductor is a plasma of ionised explosive or propellant gas, which travels through the magnetic field. Published experiments suggest that a typical arrangement uses a solid propellant gas generator, often using conventional ammunition propellant as a base. Cartridges of such propellant can be loaded much like artillery rounds, for multiple shot operation.

Whilst FCGs are potent technology base for the generation of large electrical power pulses, the output of the FCG is by its basic physics constrained to the frequency band below 1 MHz. Many target sets will be difficult to attack even with very high power levels at such frequencies, moreover focussing the energy output from such a device will be problematic. A HPM device overcomes both of the problems, as its output power may be tightly focussed and it has a much better ability to couple energy into many target types.

A wide range of HPM devices exist. From the perspective of a bomb or warhead designer, the device of choice will be at this time the Vircator, or in the nearer term a Spark Gap source. The Vircator is of interest because it is a one shot device capable of producing a very powerful single pulse of radiation, yet it is mechanically simple, small and robust, and can operate over a relatively broad band of microwave frequencies.

The physics of the Vircator tube are substantially more complex than those of the preceding devices. The fundamental idea behind the Vircator is that of accelerating a high current electron beam against a mesh or foil anode. Many electrons will pass through the anode, forming a bubble of space charge behind the anode. Under the proper conditions, this space charge region will oscillate at microwave frequencies.

If the space charge region is placed into a resonant cavity which is appropriately tuned, very high peak powers may be achieved.

Conventional microwave engineering techniques may then be used to extract microwave power from the resonant cavity. Because the frequency of oscillation is dependent upon the electron beam parameters, Vircators may be tuned or chirped in frequency, where the microwave cavity will support appropriate modes.

The Axial Vircator is the simplest by design, and has generally produced the best power output in experiments. It is typically built into a cylindrical waveguide structure.

Power is most often extracted by transitioning the waveguide into a conical horn structure, which functions as an antenna.

The Transverse Vircator injects cathode current from the side of the cavity and will typically oscillate in a Transverse Electric TE mode. Technical issues in Vircator design are output pulse duration, which is typically of the order of a microsecond and is limited by anode melting, stability of oscillation frequency, often compromised by cavity mode hopping, conversion efficiency and total power output. Coupling power efficiently from the Vircator cavity in modes suitable for a chosen antenna type may also be an issue, given the high power levels involved and thus the potential for electrical breakdown in insulators.

The issue of electromagnetic weapon lethality is complex. Unlike the technology base for weapon construction, which has been widely published in the open literature, lethality related issues have been published much less frequently. While the calculation of electromagnetic field strengths achievable at a given radius for a given device design is a straightforward task, determining a kill probability for a given class of target under such conditions is not.

This is for good reasons. The first is that target types are very diverse in their electromagnetic hardness, or ability to resist damage.

Equipment which has been intentionally shielded and hardened against electromagnetic attack will withstand orders of magnitude greater field strengths than standard commercially rated equipment. The second major problem area in determining lethality is that of coupling efficiency, which is a measure of how much power is transferred from the field produced by the weapon into the target.

Only power coupled into the target can cause useful damage. In assessing how power is coupled into targets, two principal coupling modes are recognised in the literature:. A low frequency weapon will couple well into a typical wiring infrastructure, as most telephone lines, networking cables and power lines follow streets, building risers and corridors. In most instances any particular cable run will comprise multiple linear segments joined at approximately right angles.

Whatever the relative orientation of the weapons field, more than one linear segment of the cable run is likely to be oriented such that a good coupling efficiency can be achieved.

It is worth noting at this point the safe operating envelopes of some typical types of semiconductor devices. Manufacturer's guaranteed breakdown voltage ratings for Silicon high frequency bipolar transistors, widely used in communications equipment, typically vary between 15 V and 65 V. Communications interfaces and power supplies must typically meet electrical safety requirements imposed by regulators.

Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb, Ask Latest information, Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb Abstract,Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb Report. created by- soubhagya kumar pradhan video type - education seminar presentations for electrical students. Free download complete engineering seminar Electromagnetic Bomb Seminar Report pdf. A nuclear electromagnetic pulse is a burst of electromagnetic radiation created by a nuclear . Funding was secured to enable Russian scientists to report on some of the Soviet EMP results in international scientific journals. . yield pure nuclear fission weapons, a 10 kiloton bomb can easily be 5 x 8% = 40% as powerful as. The electromagnetic bomb, or e-bomb, is a new class of weapon based on high- power The first electromagnetic pulse effect was observed during a high.

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Reports from the US [9] indicate that hardening measures attuned to the behaviour of nuclear EMP bombs do not perform well when dealing with some. Ultrawideband e-bombs aim to create an electromagnetic pulse like that accompanying a report that the institute put out in Febru- ary. “We have some fairly. E- bomb Seminar Report ' INTRODUCTION The next Pearl Harbor will not announce itself with a. The first electromagnetic pulse effect was observed during a high altitude airburst nuclear weapons testing (In July , a megaton United States nuclear. An electromagnetic bomb, or e-bomb, is a weapon designed to take advantage of this dependency. But instead of simply cutting off power in an area, an e-bomb. Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb, Ask Latest information, Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb Abstract,Electromagnetic bomb OR e Bomb Report. Abstract: High Power Electromagnetic Pulse generation techniques and High Power Microwave technology have matured to the point where practical E-bombs​. E-Bomb Seminar Report - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Electromagnetic Bomb Seminar Report pdf. Pawan Janorkar. 01 July Anyone who's been through a prolonged power outage knows that it's an extremely.Sep 29,  · E bomb seminar report 1. e bomb seminar reporte bomb seminar luhost.xyz (Size: KB / Downloads: )ABSTRACTElectromagnetic bombs are Weapons of Electrical Mass Destruction with applications across a broadspectrum of targets, spanning both the strategic and tactical. As such their use offers a very high payoffin attacking the fundamental. e Bomb Seminar Report - Free download as Word Doc .doc), PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site. Search Search. Explore E Bombs with Free Download of Seminar Report and PPT in PDF and DOC Format. Also Explore the Seminar Topics Paper on E Bombs with Abstract or Synopsis, Documentation on Advantages and Disadvantages, Base Paper Presentation Slides for IEEE Final Year Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering or ECE Students for the year An E-bomb attack would leave buildings standing and spare lives, but it could destroy a sizeable military. There is a range of possible attack scenarios. Low-level electromagnetic pulses would temporarily jam electronics systems, more intense pulses would corrupt important computer data and very powerful bursts would completely fry electric and. luhost.xyz is a platform for academics to share research papers. Nov 19,  · E- Bomb PPT PDF Seminar Report Download; Results 1 to 1 of 1. Thread: E- Bomb PPT PDF Seminar Report Download. Popular topic for study. Modification of Bus Impedance Matrix. The simplicity and generality of the method are demonstrated in two numerical examples. A direct method is presented for modification of the bus impedance matrix using a.

e bomb seminar report